You DON’T Have “Plenty of Time”

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You DON’T Have “Plenty of Time”
By Mike Tuchscherer

I’ll never forget my first 800-lbs deadlift in competition. Prior to it, I was still relatively unknown in the powerlifting world. I’d won a Jr. World championship, but I’d bombed out of four (4!) other national level meets. It was well before Facebook (at least for me) and unless you were paying attention, I was easy not to notice. It was 2007. I had recently left the collegiate ranks and I was looking for a meet and I found one in Hemet, California. Read more…

How I added 129lbs to my total in 2 blocks

It sounds unbelievable. I can scarcely believe it myself. But here’s how it went down.

If you would like to see the full program in it’s entirety, check out the Program Library inside RTS Training Lab. Full details, additional information, support for modifications, and deployment for yourself/your athletes is all available.
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5 Questions For Coaches

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This article is for the coaches…

It’s not that athletes have nothing to gain from it. It’s just that if you’re an athlete interested in evaluating your coach it should be primarily on two factors — results and enjoyment. If you are getting results and enjoying the process then I would recommend that you stay where you are. If you are not getting results or not enjoying the process then it may be time to reevaluate.

Yes for the coaches…  I have some questions to ask you.

Read more…

Winners Win

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So there I was… It was 2009. I was at the Raw Unity Meet. At the time, this was the BIGGEST raw competition on the planet. It was put on by my friend Eric Talmant and was a way for all powerlifters — equipped or raw… tested or untested… to compete at the same event under the same rules. I was in the 125kg class competing against Scott Smith, an impressively strong untested lifter from the USPF.

Read more…

How to know if you should pull out of a meet

WHEN NOT TO COMPETE, (OR THOUGHTS ON WHY WE DO) by MARK ROBB

There have been times when I struggled with the choice of whether to withdraw from a meet that I had already registered for or not, and as I have thought about this subject more, the broader the subject became. In interactions with some of my lifters, RTS teammates, USA National Teammates, as well as my own experiences, I have learned several things that I believe are worthy of consideration when you find yourself with that decision to make.

My hope is that this article might help you organize your thoughts, and maybe bring up something that you hadn’t thought about, so that you have more clarity about whatever you decide to do.

Why are you competing?

The answer to this question will help determine your choice as to whether to compete or not. And the answer to this question may actually Read more…

Note to Self: Remember the Long Term

e1RM chart for my Front Squat over the last 3 months. Green line indicates the current session that this post is about.

I’m writing this because as an athlete, it’s something I need to keep in mind.  And as a coach, I know many of you need to keep it in mind as well.  Here’s to getting better.

Today’s Front Squat session was objectively awesome. I managed 565×1 @8.5 RPE. This ties what I did last week — which is one of my best Front Squat reps of all time. Only twice have I gone heavier — and even then only 5lbs and 10lbs respectively. And those lifts ware a LOT slower.

Read more…

Training with Gym Closures

by Mike Tuchscherer, 16 March 2020

With many gyms around the world now closing for the next several weeks due to COVID-19, we’ve had several of our lifters suddenly without a place to train. Over the last few years, I’ve often found myself on the road for various reasons also without a training facility — just making due with what I could carry in a suitcase and do in a hotel room. In the case of my move a few years ago, I kept this up for basically a couple of months. While this isn’t the same thing as what lifters are facing now, I do feel it’s given me perspective on what a powerlifter could do in a situation like this to make sure this bump-in-the-road has minimal impact.

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Correcting Max-Effort Technical Deviations

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Correcting Max-Effort Technical Deviations
By Mike Tuchscherer, 10 September 2017

I’ve written before about why I think including assistance work is a good idea.  And I do mean *assistance* work, not just supplemental work.  And the more I think about it, the more convinced I become that this is the best way to develop strength over the long term.

Quick aside on exercise classification before we get started…

Competition Exercise:  The exercise as it’s performed in competition. If you squat low-bar in competition, then high bar squats are not a competition exercise.  If you wear a belt in competition, beltless work is not a competition exercise.

Assistance Exercise:  Exercises that are very closely related to the competition exercise, but contain 1-2 small changes to give the lift a certain emphasis.  Things like pause squats, deadlifts with chains, or board presses all fall into this category.

Supplemental Exercise:  Exercises that train the same muscles, but not the same movements.  Usually trained for higher reps as well.  Exercises like lunges, military press, and good mornings fit into this category.

Read more…

High Stress Training Weeks

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High Stress Training Weeks
By Mike Tuchscherer, 3 October 2017

From the inbox:

“Why vary weekly fatigue percents at all? Why not move from high reps to low reps at [medium stress] each week? The high reps provide the stimulus and the low reps allowing fatigue to dissipate? A week of 3’s at [high stress] vs week of 8’s at [medium stress]. The latter has a lower fatigue percent but higher volume- so what’s the difference in effect between the two?”

Read more…

Using Block Reviews

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Using Block Reviews
By Mike Tuchscherer, 12 September 2017

In my estimation, there is only one good reason to keep a training log – to help you make better training decisions.  That’s it.  Lots of people keep a log just to write down what they did, but never make use of the information.  What’s the point?

Our training log is a free application that ANYONE can use.  And we’re building new tools all the time to help you make better training choices.  One feature that I really love is called the Block Review.

Purpose of the Block Review

We all know that people respond differently to training.  It’s training law – the law of individual differences.  It’s trivially obvious to observe.  So once you’re past the beginning stages the question becomes how can you optimize your training so that it’s producing the best progress it can – FOR YOU.  Unfortunately no one can tell you what it is.  There is no test you can take.  There’s no system that will find it for you.  You need to find it for yourself.  And figuring this out is where the block review proves highly valuable. Read more…

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